Winter Family Fun

 

Parents & Kids Enjoying Winter  Together – A Customised Guide

Winter walk city

Snow, Sub-zero winter for 6 moths a year. Not all family members love that. According to Environmental Canada, snow fall can occur from October to April. Temperatures can range from 10degrees to -35degrees. Darkness is a companion. Many individuals become inflicted by lower motivation and energy, rallying family members to get together may require more creativity. Yet, there are numerous activities you can do with your family to have fun and bond together. Here I suggest activities for all types of interests in the family. Gardner developed the multiple intelligence model to help build awareness of the different ways children learn based on their natural interests and learning style. I used this 8 multiple intelligences model to develop  family fun activities which are relevant to your family members. My hope is to help you avoid that whine, “That’s boring, I don’t want to do that”. (Feel free to scroll through to your children).

 

Family Fun with your Physically Active Children

  • Build a model together. Visit your local hobby or craft shops for model kits – pieces for cars, places, buildings, etc. Or, you can carve out a car or plane with soft wood. Adding a new peice every year becomes a proud collection to display. Later, it may become an heirloom to display and pass on to your kids when they grow up.

 

  •  Visit the indoor rock-climbing facility for some active fun together. (In South Edmonton: Vertically Inclined Rock Gym)

 

  •  Visit an indoor amusement park (here in Edmonton we have Galaxyland). Alternatively you may visit a neighbourhood indoor play centre (e.g. Play Gym in Summerside, Ellerslie), book time at the local recreational centre gymnasium for an hour family hoops. Some community recreational centres  (e.g., Terwillegar) have drop in/ playrooms too.

 

Coming soon : Oudoor winter family fun

Family Fun With Your Social Children

  • Have them help host a family (or family & best friend) themed party for the holidays. It could be Boxing Day, New Years Eve, New Years Day, the last Saturday night of the holidays, whatever time works for you.
  •  Play family party games: Charades, Taboo, Cranium, & Pictionary, are just some of my favourites. I am sure you kids have ideas for other trendy party games so be sure to ask for their input. Maybe select a family member to chair family game night on a rotational schedule.
  •  Take your child out on a one-one date. It could be to the local coffee shop for hot chocolate or checking out the latest released movie at the cinema.

 

 

Fun With Your Talkative/Expressive Child

  •  Take your children out for a night-time drive to look at the holiday lights and displays. Engage in and enjoy the conversations that emerge (or that you, well,… initiate).

 

  • Read aloud a classic or contemporary book. Read a chapter or 2 together aloud at night before bedtime. (Trust me, even the disengaged teenager, warms up to listening to a good story, but keep your expectations low, s/he is not gonna “show” it). Some of my favourites are: Anne of Green Gables, Little Woman, Chronicles of Narnia, Oliver Twist, Lord of the Rings, the Hobbit, and The Christmas Carol. Ask your local librarian for suggestions. I recommend if you want to borrow the book from the library to place it on hold. (The last 2 years my family has been reading from the Chronicles of Narnia, I always have to place on early hold on the book at the library. Preview the book first before introducing it to the family. One year I brought in Treasure Island but the old-sailor-english was impossible for us to follow, even though it was a good story. That’s the teacher in me)

Family Fun With Your Analytic, Systematic Child

  • Visit your local hobby shop or bookstore and purchase a logic puzzle book for the season. You can solve puzzles together. If you are competitive (which is okay to be) you may purchase multiple copies of the same book and race to see who solves the puzzle first.

 

  •  Recruit your logical/analytical child to help support your social child in planning any family gathering parties.

 

  •  Play strategic games together. Some great traditional board game are Chess, Mancala, Monopoly, and Chineese Checkers. Many of these are available as apps. Two cool websites to check for online smart games are coolmath-games.com and sheppardsoftware.com.  Two other apps you may check out are Unblockme and Elevate.

Coming soon related: Family time apps

 

Family Fun  With Your Musical Child

  • Create a CD of your favourite holiday or Christmas songs. Host a Holiday Karaoke party.
  • Attend a Christmas pageant or play at a local church or school. If you have teenagers you might consider visiting a show in a distant, unfamiliar neighbourhood. Try this to avoid losing your family time to your teenagers’ friends.
  • Re-compose a favourite holiday song as a rap, country or a reggae tune. This is especially fun if you incorporate musical instruments. (An electrical keyboard often comes pre-programed with beats representing various styles of music – NO musical talent required – I don’t have any myself ).

Family  Fun With  Your Artistic Child

  • Make your own ornaments together. It may be as simple as cutting out shapes from foam sheets  and stringing it with pipe-cleaners (from dollarstore). Craft stores also offer a range of wood-cut outs, papermache or ceramic ornaments to personalise.
  •   Create a snow-globe together. Each person places an item in the globe which represents a special memory they had with the family this year. This memorabilia can be made of modelling clay.
  •  Create a holiday scrapbook or blog. Take pictures of special events and experiences over the season. You can create a few scrapbook pages with printed pictures, or you can create a family digital album. Dedicate a time every year to look over previous holiday memories.

 

Family Fun with Reflective/Service Oriented Child

 

  •  Volunteer with a shelter or food bank to help pack hampers for families.
  •  Celebrate Positivity & Kindness – encourage conversations where family members share a story about something inspirational or encouraging to them. It could be a quote, a story of someone else act of kindness, or an experience they had helping someone recently. Sit around in a circle and pass around a symbol which gives the holder sole speaking rights.
  • Family Ladder time – Ladders are symbolic of climbing towards reaching a desired item or goal. Winter is a great time to reflect on how our lives have unfolded in the last year and visualise about what you would like to become in the new year. Host a family meeting and invite each of your children and teenagers, and adults, to set goals for their personal development. Write each down on a 3X5 index card and post them on a foam-core board. In family therapy, I invite families to draw a ladder with 4 rungs representing every 90 days. In a family counselling session families review their goal cards and tell in honest accountability where they are in their journey (what challenges they’ve had, changes made, success stories). After each person shares they move themselves to the next rung. (Sharing a short version of one of my play therapy activities with you).

Fun  with your Nature Loving Child

  • Go for a nature walk, collecting your own greenery for homemade wreaths of garlands
  •  Go for a walk around your neighbourhood in the full-moon. Look up on almanac when the next full moon will be. Bring along a mug of hot chocolate.
  •  Collect the sand castle molds and shovels and go out in the snow and build snow castles.
  •  Sit by a park lake and watch the animals. Squirrels can be very entertaining, at least,… for a while. Or, if you have really young kids hunting for cloud pictures is always. Or, play a game of 10 questions with young teens.  The whole idea is to be outside enjoying nature together. Do whatever you love to do together.

Final Thoughts.

Our children have naturally different interests, as wise parents we will try to consider their individuality in planning family time with them. If you have more than 4 children you might need to have multiple activities in a family time, or have family times more frequently. It is impossible to please everybody all of the time but do try to please everyone at least once in awhile. It will go a long way to helping build a sense of belonging, reduce conflict, and protect your family from needing interventions from counselling professionals like myself.

For more  family fun ideas read some of our other posts

Share  your ideas, what do you do with your family in the winter  months? Do you have a child with special needs, how would  you adapt any of these to fit your family?

 

Help for Families Canada offers an one of a kind parenting program. We are passionate about helping families come together and enjoy each other more. Msg us if we could help you.

 

Posted in General Family, Parenting, Parenting 0-5, Parenting 6-12, Parenting Teens | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

How to Reduce Conflict at Family Holiday Gatherings

Family fightsBeing With Family You Don’t Like.

For many families the holidays are special times to connect with loved ones they don’t see often but, it can also be stressful as a backdrop for opposing personalities to collide. What if you could get together for hours with your siblings, in-laws, step-family members, (and others) over a holiday meal and leave without arguing or fighting explosively with anyone? Here are some tips to help you have a happier family holiday this year.

Family conflict signs

Signs of Conflict

Look for the warning signs. If you see any of these behaviours unfolding in your conversation with a family member you might be on the edge of another unfriendly dispute. (Based on the conflict research by Dr. Rob Kendal, Psychology Today)

  1. Blaming. Energy is focused on assigning blame on the other for the problem instead of seeking a solution.
  2. Intensity. Emotions take over, the intensity rises, voices raise and threats and insults are hurled.
  3. Dismissal of the other’s ideas and feelings. (“Yes, but…”). The other party’s opinions and feelings are ignored because they differ from the speaker. Persons therefore become argumentative and defensive in order to get heard or to win the debate.
  4. Domination and control of the conversation. This may look like interrupting, completing the other’s sentences, steering the topic and flow of the conversation, etc.

 

How to Turn Things Around (Relationship Repair)

Okay, what if you tried to swerve around conversation dangers but you still find yourself in a dispute with your family nemesis? Here are a few strategies to try to reduce the damage and avoid ruining the party:

Help for Families iconExpress appreciation. According to J. Gottman (renowned relationship expert) taking a moment to acknowledge appreciation for the other person’s experience or willingness to express their differing ideas has been proven to soothe escalating persons. Say something like … “I didn’t know that you saw things that way, I’m glad you told me”.

Help for Families iconFocus the conversation on finding a solution instead of the complaints and blaming someone. Ask yourself and the other person, “What can I do to help the situation…?”

Help for Families iconRepeat what you’ve heard the other person saying. Hold back on putting forward your own perspective. Let them know you understand their position. Desist from offering your best, well-intentioned advice (even if it is also widely proven and endorsed by experts Smiling counsellor).

Help for Families iconAccept some responsibility. Look for how your actions or words might have contributed to the argument/fight. It is the more courageous, more mature position to say, “Can I take that back?” or, “You’re right, I could have been (more/less)…..” You can prove to be the better person and not make them bitter too.

Help for Families iconFinally, Escape. When you hear the argument intensifying and becoming hostile find a reason to excuse yourself. You could go get another helping of pie (or something), or help the host with a chore, or refresh yourself in the washroom.

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7 Keys to Disciplining Your Anxious Child

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Transform Your Parenting From Doubtful to Confident & Effective

Some parents of anxious children have become anxious about disciplining their child because they have been told being ‘harsh’ induces anxiety in children. Here you’ll gather a few simple keys to help you as a parent address this sensitive matter.

One Parent’s Story: Can You Relate? 

Tamika (alias), a mother of 2 children, 7 year old and 13 year old,  came to see me for help supporting her 7 year old son who had “become clingy”,  and “demanding of reassurance” and she was second guessing her every decision she made with them. Her older child was assertive, socially engaging, and tended towards being risky. She was torn in how to support  her son. She wanted to protect him and build his confidence, she spoke words of encouragement but she constantly, silently questioned if she was “babying him”. She was also feeling restricted by his need to be with her, but, of course, she couldn’t withdraw herself. When he didn’t do his chores, for example, he would complain it was too much, too hard, and she was “being too bossy”. She hesitated with being firm about him completing them independently. It was easier to help him. Tamika learnt the seven keys to #discipline and, not over-night, but within 6 months had learnt how to say no with love and without guilt, how to parent to the different needs of her two different children, and how to support her son’s confidence in her love and presence.

So here are some of the tools that Tamika learnt in parent coaching sessions. (There was more but I can only give a limit in a blog-post, but this is enough to make a significant step in changing your parent-child relationship). Take and implement one key at a time; be kind to yourself and allow yourself room to master (which includes making mistakes) your own transformation.

  1. Set clear rules and expectations. Give your child a vivid description and experience of what your expectations and standards are. You may role-play out your rules and procedures. When communicating your rules talk about the underpinning values so that they understand why the rule exists and the importance of respecting it. For example, we don’t have cell-phones at the dinner table because spending time focusing on family relationships is important. And, discuss the process of communications – how warnings and consequences will be given and implemented. Knowledge is security for your anxious child.

 

2. Consistency is key. Inconsistency is anxiety provoking for any young child. Set up regular routines – a predictable pattern of when, where, and how things are done. Predictability increases their sense of safety.

 

3. Be a good role model of stress & emotional management. This is self-explanatory but worth mentioning. If you remain calm and are disciplined in your approach to life and problems your child will model your behaviour in his life. The best way for your child to learn discipline is by experiencing at home.

Parenting Anxious Child Calm

BE CALM.
Source: Lukasz Szmigiel -Unsplash

4. Communicate unconditional love. “Make sure he knows that although you want and expect him to do better next time, you love him no matter what” (Foxman, p.99). This is significant for your child as they are prone to having perfectionistic standards and judging themselves worthy based on their ability to please others. They are likely to view a single incident of displeasure from you as a global rejection of themselves. Your anxious child often needs frequent assurance of your unconditional love and acceptance of them. One suggestion to support this is the occasional offering of grace. That is, every once in a while, surprise them by pardoning their act of indiscretion – no preaching, no consequences, just forgive and forget it. When they receive grace they learn to be gracious to themselves.

 

5. Ensure your expectations are developmentally “reasonable”. Statistically speaking, parents of anxious children are likely to either underestimate or over-estimate their child’s abilities, coping skills, and stress tolerance. Your child may already have unreasonably high expectations of themselves (which they worry about meeting), ensure you are not compounding this by having unreasonable standards too. Consult with teachers or parent educators or research about what behaviours and discipline procedures are appropriate for your child’s age. For example, the homework of a 16 year old should require less monitoring than an 8 year old. By over-monitoring a 16 year old, one may be communicating a lack of confidence in her and denying her the opportunity to develop the self-discipline skills she needs to independently succeed in life.

 

6. Discuss or offer a positive alternative the next time a similar situation occurs. Children do not always know the right thing to do in a problematic situation. When correcting them include a statement of instruction on appropriate ways to behave. For example, “we do not run away from the classroom when we do not want to read in class, instead we can… (a), ..(b), or …(c).” With older children you can guide them through the problem solving process by asking them to tell you a number of possible solutions and selecting the most appealing.

 

7. Establish your authority as a safety net. Because of their need for personal safety many anxious children become the little directors and authorities in their families. Their controlling behaviours, which may include some non-compliance, are often problematic for parents who do not understand the security need behind it. The misconception most parents develop is that children need to be in control to feel safe. However, what your anxious child needs is for you to affirm yourself as the competent authority figure in their lives; they need to know you are capable and trustworthy of being in control in their lives. This doesn’t mean becoming dominant or controlling but it does mean having clear limits, and standing confident in your enforcement of these limits. Based on their own personalities and personal issues, some parents need support as they begin to assert themselves, either from a counsellor or partner.

 

The task of discipline is primary in the role of being a parent but though it has it’s challenges (learning by trial and error and retrial) you can be successful in helping your anxious child develop the self-discipline he or she needs to be independently successful in life.

Additional Anxiety Resources For Parents

Anxiety Disorders Association of America

Anxiety Disorders Association of Canada -Find your local province chapter for more resources.

Mistake Monday– A Challenge to reduce perfectionism in families. This is an illustration of the types of playful approaches that I use in family play therapy to help support the family system.

#playtherapy #edmonton

YouTube Video on Childhood Anxiety

 

Help for Families Canada offers play therapy (counselling) for children in South Edmonton who suffer from excessive worries, difficulty separating from parents, appear socially withdrawn (shy), or is driven for perfection. We also coach parents in how to manage these behaviours at home and in the community (parent skills training).

Invitation to Help Other Families & Parents

YOU are also an Expert. I would love to hear your thoughts about these 7 keys.

  • Which keys do you agree with?
  • Is there a key point that you’ve tried but found unfruitful?
  • Which key would you be the most challenging for you to implement now?
  • What other keys would you add to the list?
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What’s Reasonable to Expect from Your Child’s Social Skills? – Info and Tips.

Selman (1981) proposed an idea of how children’s skills and perspectives on friendships develop over time. Outlined here as well are suggestions for how you, as a parent, can use this to guide and support your child’s social skills and strengthen your family relationships.

Stage 1: Friendship Based on Proximity  (3-7 years)

Definition: Anyone who is sharing the physical space can be a ‘friend’ in that moment. They express no sense of “loyalty” to friends. They are easily distracted by the new kid in the room with the newest toys.

Parenting Implications: 

This is a phase to be very relaxed about your expectations of your child’s relationships. Planning play-dates for them around your convenience and even your friends is acceptable. Don’t be disturbed if they express no sense of “loyalty” to friends. Teach your child how to enter and exit a playgroup graciously. Additionally, talk about and “practise” different ways to manage being left behind or excluded in a playgroup.

Similarly at this stage “family” are those people around me that play with me. To begin to lay core family relationship values I encourage you to spend time with them in their space sharing a similar activity with or alongside them.

Stage 2: One-Way Assistance  (4-9 years)

A friend is someone who does what you want them to, who helps you and “shares” some interests  (or, at least, offers little resistance to one’s interests).

Parenting Implications :

Teach children how to share with and help others.

Begin to introduce children to the basic process of how to talk to their friends about what they feel, want, and need. The first step is to help them to identify their own feelings and wants so that they can communicate these to others. During family interactions describe to your child what you think they are feeling and wanting in the situation and then seek clarification from them about the accuracy of your understanding.  Be patient however with your expectations of them genuinely empathising with the needs and views of others, this often doesn’t develop until age 9+.

As a family do things together that is fun for everyone. Promote routines such as chores as a way to help and share the responsibilities in the family.

Stage 3: Fair Weather Cooperation (6-12 years)

Friendship is conditional on “getting along”. Friendships easily ‘dissolve’ once there is a disagreement or conflict.  Children now describe their friends in terms of personal characteristics or qualities.

Parenting Implications:

Speak to your child about the value of commitment in friendships. This is an important phase to talk with your child about the qualities that make a “good friend”; encourage them how to be a good friend and recognise a good friend. Point out that good friends are hard to find and worth keeping in spite of differences of opinion.  Watching and commenting on the relationships in the media is a non-intrusive way to explore these values. You may also use family relationships, such as siblings,  as model for how relationships endure over differences.

Continue to support your child’s problem-solving skills.

Discuss with your children the core values underlying the family rules and routines you establish.

Stage 4: Intimate & Mutually Shared Relationships  (9-15 years)

Intimacy and getting to know each other begins to develop in friendships. They begin to share their problems, concerns, secrets with select friends. They can resolve conflicts. They may be very possessive of their best-friend or “bff” at this stage. Cliques may develop and become exclusive.

In adolescence, the ups and downs of friendships may have significant impact on youth’s emotional well-being.

Parenting Implications:  

Model and structure more egalitarian styles of relating for youth in your family relationships. Ensure that youth have the basic skills of how to be open and communicative of their thoughts and feelings and to be empathetic towards the thoughts and feelings of others.

If your  teen has a good quality friend, trust them and take comfort in it. Don’t take it too personally if your child is sharing more with her bff than you, at least you know she/he has someone to share with.

Set limits on special family time as exclusive time too.  Explain that special family times are times with them when you do not want to share them with their “other friends” whether it be virtual  phone/internet/text or physical.  Negotiate with your child how you set these limits. Some families have no phones at dinner time, some families have scheduled exclusive family activities.

Continue to reinforce in your tween’s values what defines a “good friend”, how to be one as well as recognise one.  This can be done quite casually be describing and commenting on other observed relationships you see in the media.

Stage 5: Autonomous Independent Friendships (12-adult)

Friendships can still be intimate and supportive but they allow individuals more freedom to have other friendships and relationships.

Parenting Implications:

They are forming their own support system now and are growing less reliant on you for support. This does not mean that you are no longer important to them or that you are not a significant source of support but you may have to become more accepting of their other relationships. This is a time for you as a parent to expand on and strengthen your own social relationship.  As your older teen (17+) develops more independence and maturity you will find your relationship transition into a more equal relationship where you can disclose more about your own life with them.

In regards to family relationships, you can continue to sustain a routine of family time as you have had but should now be involving your mature teen in the decision making about family activities. Ask them to plan a family night? Ask them about and show consideration for their schedule when planning family activities?  Be open to including a special friend or romantic partner in what would have been an exclusive family activity.

 

Additional resource

How Cliques Make Kids Feel Left Out

 

What other strategies have you used to help your child expand their social circle and keep them closely connected to your family. Please share your thoughts below.

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Love Relationship: Should you breakup?

  Most Critical Dating Advice for Women Online

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The Co-Parents’ Guide to Holiday Gift Giving- Tips to Reduce Conflict and Stress.

               

Give Love, Great Gifts, and Avoid Stress.

  1. RULE #1. Leave the competitive spirit out of the holidays. Your gift to your child is about your love for them; it is not about how better you are than their other parent. Competing with your ex through gift-giving will do definite harm to your relationship with your child.  Teens especially see through this and, though they will accept your gift, they will also resent it. One tip to avoid this is to agree with your co-parent on the budget for gifts beforehand.

2.  Schedule with your co-parent a time where you go shopping with the children, (if that’s what you do) and/or a time for opening presents. Maybe this year you’ll open presents at your house on Christmas Eve or Boxing Day or maybe New Years. (Put all schedule arrangements in writing)

3. Have children create separate lists for each household. 

 

4. Share or Coordinate gifts. If a child wants a single expensive item, e.g., a computer, share the costs and make it a joint gift from Mom and Dad. Yes, divorced couples can still do that, and it sends a positive message to the kids. Or coordinate complimentary gifts. For example, if Amy wants the new Little Pet Shop Doll, one parent buys the doll and the other buys some related accessories.

5. Talk with each other on what you plan to buy and set a reasonable budget. Let the other parent know what you plan to buy so as to avoid duplication. If you set budgets for Christmas gifts, maximum of 100 per child, engage your parenting partner in that discussion.

Read Related :Gary Direnfeld  shares Four Strategies for Planning Spending This Christmas

6.  Take the high road and talk through potential conflicts about the appropriateness of gifts. If dad doesn’t think his 11 year old daughter is old enough to have a cell-phone please do not buy it for her without at least having that conversation with him. If there is a difference of opinion on the appropriateness of a gift engage the other parent to find out what are their concerns. If Molly had the cell-phone what are you afraid would happen? Listen to find out where the concerns lie, is it about how the gift affects her (distraction from schoolwork), the family (disconnection from family due to pre-occupation on cell with friends) or the parent (having to pay the bill)?  Maybe once to get to the core of the concern you can then brainstorm alternate strategies to reduce or eliminate these and find an agreeable solution. For example, maybe set mutually agreed upon rules about how the gift will be used at each home, e.g., turn off the cell phone at meal times.  If no mutually agreeable solution is forthcoming, it is also possible to limit that gift to the supporting parent’s house. So, when Molly visits Dad she leaves the cell-phone at your house. #kids

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Understanding Play Therapy- How Play Helps Your Child Heal

Play Therapy in Counselling Children in Southside Edmonton

 

 

 

Play Therapy Kids Southside Edmonton

Kids Heal Themselves in Play Therapy

 

Play Therapy is a modality of helping children express and process their feelings and experiences. Play is a child’s language and the toys in the playroom they select to use are their words.  Just as in traditional adult therapy, adults talk out their feelings and problems, in play therapy a child plays out his/her feelings and experiences.

Play therapy can be directive or child-centered. In directive play therapy the therapist directs the content and flow of the child’s play experience often by structuring the toys and processes the child experiences. On the other hand, play therapy can be non-directive or child centered, here the child determines the content and flow of the play process, and the therapist follows the child and supports them in their experience. The principle of child-centered play therapy is to promote the child’s experience of unconditional acceptance, mastery and control over their life, and self-directed growth.

 

Boys in Play Therapy in Leduc, Beaumont & Edmonton

Boy works through issues while playing in the sand

 

My style is predominately  semi-structured, which is a combination of both styles. That is, I sometimes incorporate proportions of both directive and child-directive  activities within a counselling session. In the early stages of relationship building I will be more child-centered or non-directive but on occasion, depending on where the child is in their process, I may step in and out of a more directive role.  In a directive portion I may set out a therapuetic game for the child and I to play, or I read a issue-related story with them, or act out a related problem with puppets or miniatures in the sandtray. In the non-directive portion the child is invited to explore the playroom and select the toys or activities that they are interested in playing with, the child then engages in that play while I witness, validate and reflect on their feelings and experiences, and support their process – making them feel heard, safe, and accepted.

play-problem-solver-quote-tania-bryan-therapy-edmonton

Demonstration of What Play in Therapy Looks Like

Individual sessions with a child is confidential. Parents do not get to observe their child’s engagement and many are left wondering outside the room, “what’s really going on in there?”

Below is a link to a video – Play Therapy Works by the American Association of Play Therapist (APT) illustrating in more detail the benefits of play and play therapy. (#playtherapy)

Watch Video:    Play Therapy Works – Child Therapy https://youtu.be/_4ovwAdxCs0

Talking To Kids About Going To See A Counselor or Psychologist

Do you wonder how to talk to your child about coming to see a counselor? Below is a great article by another play therapist on what to say before bringing your child to counselling, and how to talk with your child about therapy once counselling has begun.

Open ArticleExplaining Play Therapy to Children

My Qualifications to Do Play Therapy

I have been studying play therapy since summer of 2001. Over the years I have attended dozens of professional development courses. As part of my Masters Degree  at Simon Fraser University I conducted research on the dynamics of Parent-Child Play where I observed mothers playing with their children and interviewed both parents and children about their experiences of play at home.  I am a member of the British Columbia Play Therapy Association (BCPTA) and the Canadian Association for Child and  Play Therapy (CACPT) and in the process of completing my certification as a Registered Play Therapist. My work is supervised by two registered play therapist supervisors both of whom have made noteworthy contributions to child psychotherapy locally and in Canada.

Art in Play in Therapy is Transforming Kids in South Edmonton

Art is a free medium for expressing experiences for kids. Fun & Healing.

Request A Call

Parent Resources To Find Out More Information About Play Therapy

American Association for Play Therapy 

Canadian Association for Child and Play Therapy 

British Columbia Play Therapy Association 

Alberta Play Therapy Association

Let’s talk today about how I can help your child.  

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8 Ways to Connect with Your Teen

Parenting Relationship Teen Help Families Canada

Source: Pixabay Public Domain

Fun Ways to Draw Closer to Your Adolescent

Sadly many parents and teen’s relationships grow in distance during the teen years. Parents get discouraged by their teen’s pre-occupation with their peers and media and their “apparent” disinterest in spending time with their family. However, their apathy is only an illusion. Teens do want to connect with their families but they won’t initiate. Parents this means you have to take the lead. Here are some suggestions of ways you may connect with your teen.

1.       Family Photo Sort – Print out some of those digital family photos from recent family events. Have teens help you sort them out. Invite each family member to create a page for themselves with a collection of their favourite family pics. As you go through this activity be open to ask each other about your memories of the events. 

2.       Family Jam Session. Teens spend a lot of time listening to music on their iPods. Do you know what are your teen’s favourite tunes? Remember when you were a teen and the greatest thing was your own “mixed tape” of your favourite music? (Okay, maybe I am dating myself). Create a playlist of your favourite music, invite your teen(s) to do the same. Set aside a time to have a family jam session where each person plays their playlist. CAUTION: This is not the time to criticise the lyrics of your teens’ songs. Allow yourselves to sing out loud, get up and dance (or sway). Do ask them open questions: “tell me about this artist?”  Comment on the genre: “many of these songs are hip-hop, do you like that style of music best? What other songs would you add to this list?”. Tell them which of their favourites you like best. (Try hard to find one, please). Ask them to tell you which of yours they like best too. You may extend this activity by asking your teens to create a family playlist so the next time you are going on a long road trip you can All listen to some music together. 

 3.       LikeU-Texting – Send your teen a random text telling them 3 things you like about them.

 4.       Do a JigSaw Puzzle together. Your teen may say they don’t want to but most teens will get into it, after a while. 

 5.       BFF Date. Get to know your teen’s best friend. During adolescence this person may have as much, maybe more, influence in your teen’s life as you do. Arrange to spend time with your teen and their best friend at a place of their choice. Let the teens choose where s/he is willing to be ‘seen’ out with you. Be prepared you may have to drive to another city J – maybe a sport’s game, a movie, at a restaurant, or at home playing their favourite video game. A note about video gaming, you need to be at ease with the possibility of being embarrassed as a gamer. Many parents who focus on their game performance withdraw from such activities and miss the value of the quality time altogether.

 6.       Celebrate their accomplishments. Remember when your child was a preschooler or young child you would display their accomplished art and achievements on the fridge door and talk to all your friends about them. Why not celebrate with the same gusto your teens achievements or joyous events? Buy a cake when your daughter get asked on their first date or gets noticed by the guy she’s been crushing on, order in their favourite ethnic food when your son makes the sport’s team, take a special trip when your child stands up to that bully. Rejoice when they rejoice.

 7.       Share a Personal Grief Story. Yes, it is great to share our accomplishments but your teens need to see or hear about your hurts and losses to know that you are real. When we share only the great positives we send the unintentional subconscious message, “I am perfect, you should be too”. This is discouraging and creates distance when a teen feel s/he can’t live up to their parents. Share with your teen a time in your adolescence when you were hurt, felt betrayed, felt rejected, or embarrassed. Let them know how you dealt with it. If you didn’t deal with it well, let them know.  You may say something like, “I know now that this was not the best way to deal with it, maybe I should have _________”. This actually teaches teens that they can own their pain and learn from it.  

 8.       Do a Community Act of Service Together. As a former youth leader, I was always pleasantly surprised at how passionately teens, including the ‘cool’ boys, can get behind a cause. Volunteer as a family to help a neighbour move, to serve food at the food-bank, organise a neighbourhood toy drive for children living in a women’s shelter, train together and do a Run for a cause, and so forth. You may discover a new appreciation of your teen’s compassion as you serve together.

Please remember this is about maintaining relationship. Your teen may not “seem” eager to spend time with you, but this is only an illusion. I have spoken to many tough, apathetic teens who deeply wish they had a closer relationship with their parent(s). And may I add for the emphasis, this includes the boys. You may have to do an activity more than once for it to ‘catch on’ for them. You may have to be flexible and spontaneous and shift the flow of an interaction. Be courageous and reach out to your teen in one of these ways today.

 

Posted in General Family, Parenting, Parenting Teens | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Legacy of a Father’s Love and Influence

Inspiring Story of the Difference Dad Made

Parenting, Fathers, Daddy's Girl Maple Ridge

Dad’s make a difference. This Father’s Day I hope to inspire fathers to continue to love, support and give to their children. Children learn discipline and courage, have fun, gain security, and a powerful reference of relationships through the attachment they develop with their fathers. Here is a personal story of the impact my father had on my life.

This post was origionally composed as my opening article for this blog on his birthday.

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My daddy is a paragon of patience, our in-home comic, is kind, my greatest fan and cheer leader, and my inspiration. Today, (July 11) is my Daddy’s 79th birthday and in honour of him I wanted to share some of my memories to inspire other fathers (and parents generally) to love their daughters/family with a similar sincerity.

My daddy is Frank E. He was raised with his sister and brother by “Indi”, a single mother. Frank was a chartered accountant who loved the world of numbers and finance and spent most of his career working in the banking sector. He raised his first child, Lauren, with the help of his mother until she was 16 when she took the opportunity to live overseas with her mother. In the late sixties he married my mother and 4 years later they had me, and then 4 years later, my sister, Trecia.

He was a very handsome young man and maintained his looks well into his middle years. He always dressed well and I remember his early morning laps around our front lawn to keep himself fit. As a little girl I would enjoy occasionally joining him for a few laps, walking/jogging, talking and joking.

Daddy was a jokester. His jokes were almost never funny but in a corny kind-of-way that made us love him for his loving attempt to amuse us. He was a follower of people like the 3 Stooges, Wayne and Shuster, and Benny Hill. I remember the joke of “Mr. Chester” he would recite and act out cracking up to himself. Even in his saddest moment, after the death of his mother, he kept his humour, joking about the loads of hankies he had for his impending tears.

He was also a kind, dependable provider. Whenever I needed something, the way a teenage girl ‘needs’ a new outfit, he would mostly ‘seemingly reluctantly’ open up his wallet to me. Dad provided more than cash, he was also a faithful, incredibly patient transporter. Dad would drive us anywhere no matter the distance, drop us off and pick us  ( and a carload of our friends) up again. My Dad would sit in his parked car for up to 1 hr for us at the party if we decided to stay longer. As I visualise him sitting in that grey Peugeot now, tears well up in my eyes because I never did enough to thank him for his extra-ordinary patience.

I also remember movie times with my dad. Sunday morning matinees after breakfast were special times we shared. I would snuggle next to him on the living room sofa or in his bed and watch some of his favourite actors in action –James Stewart, Cary Grant, Spencer Tracey & Kathryn Hepburn, Gina Rogers & Fred Astaire, etc. He taught me that a movie is only as good as the actors involved. (This is probably why I hardly go to the movies these
days, with CGI who acts anymore?).

My Daddy was an encourager. He made me feel more valued than millions of $$$ by the pride he expressed in me. It’s one thing to tell your child you’re proud of them & their accomplishments but my Dad would brag about me. Wherever we were, whenever I was with him and we would run into his friends he would boast to them about how I was doing in school or at work (he still did this when I became an adult). He made me want to make him always be proud of me. So when I was tempted as a teenager to engage in risky behaviours  (drugs, unprotected sex, etc) I was restrained by the thought of possibly disappointing my Dad.

One of the long-standing effects of my father’s love for me is outlived in my choice of husband. How could a girl who was so thoroughly loved the first man in her life settle for anything less? One conscious criteria for mate selection for me was a man who would love me as husband but also would love our children like he did as a father.  Most parents have love for their children, but my Daddy’s love is KNOWN by his children. My father gave me the reference in experience to recognise a good man when I met him. Through my husband, B & R, also have this experience of unconditional love.

Today my Dad is unable to read this. His body is severely damaged by over 15 years of Parkinson’s disease . He is unable to tell me any corny jokes as his speech is incomprehensible. He doesn’t know/remember his grandchildren (my children), even his namesake – B. Frank as Alzheimer emerges. My hope is some disengaged father will be encouraged to step up and be a daddy, or fathers will be encouraged to sustain their efforts in loving their kids. A Daddy’s love has lifetime and multi-generational effects.

Happy Birthday Daddy, I LOVE YOU!!!

Thank you for reading. My father died in Fall 2013 after a courageous fight with Parkinsons Disease for 20 years. The disease didn’t beat him, at 81 years we finally let him go. He had done his part; the legacy of his love and influence lives on within us.

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Posted in Dating Issues, General Family, Parenting, Parenting 6-12, Parenting Teens | 5 Comments